When Hearing Aids Are Not Cutting It, Active Middle Ear Implants Might Do.

Posted by Ashley Derrington on December 4, 2018

You may not know they exist or what they are, but active middle ear implants – or AMEIs as they are sometimes referred to – have created new treatment options for some people with hearing loss. An AMEI refers to a surgically implanted hearing device that directly interacts with a part of the middle ear – one or more of the tiny middle ear bones (i.e., middle ear ossicles) – and is “active” in that it is imparting its own energy on the middle ear rather than just being a passive prosthetic. Active middle ear implants (AMEIs) can be either fully implanted with nothing external or semi-implanted with an external portion and an internal portion.

Some argue that part of the clinical value AMEIs offer is derived from “provid[ing] direct drive hearing in which sound is converted directly to vibratory energy and transmitted to the ossicles. …Converting sound directly to energy is more efficient and ultimately may provide improved speech discrimination and preferred sound quality compared to [conventional hearing aids].” [i] 

How do they work?

Active middle ear implants work differently depending on the device, but they all directly drive the middle ear with mechanical energy as opposed to just making sounds louder, like the conventional hearing aids. The direct interaction with the middle ear can help overcome some of the limitations of conventional hearing aids.

Who’s a candidate?

AMEI’s are designed to alleviate a certain type and level of hearing loss.

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Topics: untreated or under-treated, hear everyday, all-day, Safety, live well with hearing loss, hearing loss

Increasing Costs of Untreated Hearing Loss

Posted by Envoy Medical Staff Member on November 2, 2018

Emotional and Psychological Costs of Untreated Hearing Loss

Many people assume the main effect of hearing loss is difficulty perceiving spoken communication, environmental sounds and music. But there are secondary psychological and emotional effects to consider, as well. Individuals with hearing loss commonly report anger, denial, isolation, social withdrawal, fatigue and depression. Let’s take a closer look at some of those effects.

  1. Feelings of isolation. Persons with hearing impairment may withdraw or distance themselves socially because they find it too difficult to hear and take part in conversation, creating a sense of isolation. Or they may feel embarrassed that they need to frequently ask for repetition. This withdrawal may in turn cause depression, frustration, annoyance or sadness in their family members and other communication partners.
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Topics: costs, untreated or under-treated, hearing loss

Hearing loss is a lifelong journey that can be an emotional roller-coaster. It can be daunting, frustrating, and isolating. It is important to know, however, that you are not alone. You are one of tens of millions of people live with some type and level of hearing loss. There is a broad community of people who understand what you are going through. 
 
That being said, your journey is unique, and how you approach your hearing loss is up to you. Hopefully, with the support and guidance of family, friends, and, of course, hearing healthcare professionals.  
 
The Sounding Board blog is designed to provide some insight on everything from general hearing loss topics to the specific experiences of individuals willing to share some stories from their personal journey.
 
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